Tag Archives: curiosities

10 MODERN English words YOU should know

18 Nov

Thanks to globalization, the English language is now being spoken all around the world. That means English is more alive and evolving faster than ever.

New English words are everywhere now. Our vocabulary is constantly growing, becoming more colorful and more diverse. Some new English words are ones which have existed for a very long time, but are now used in unique combinations or have developed completely new meanings. Other new English words appear out of nowhere, being invented by creative people or being modified by other languages. Even more new English words are coming from the Internet, which is a powerful force for communication and creation.

1. Earworm

A song or tune that, once you’ve heard it, is stuck in your head.

Use it: “That new Taylor Swift song is such an earworm!”

2. Staycation

Spending your holiday in your hometown rather than travelling abroad. Often spent relaxing around the house or doing activities in the local area.

Use it: “I’m having a staycation this summer, as I’m trying to save money.”

3. Webisode

An episode or series created exclusively for online viewing. This can be part of a web series or used to promote a television series.

Use it: “There’s a new Breaking Bad webisode online, have you seen it?”

4. Crowdfunding

Funding a project or business venture by asking a large number of people (typically online) to invest a small amount of money – usually via websites such as Kickstarter and Indiegogo.

Use it: “We raised enough money to launch our business using crowdfunding.”

5. Glamping

Glamorous camping! Avoiding any rough conditions with luxurious facilities and accommodation, such as a yurt or cabin.

Use it: “We’re going to be glamping at Glastonbury this year.”

6. Lookalike

Something or someone that closely resembles something else, often used to describe someone who looks very similar to a celebrity.

Use it: “Have you seen the Prince William and Kate Middleton lookalikes over there?”

7. Handover

This word has a more political significance, in terms of gaining land or ownership. However, its modern usage is commonly in the workplace: The act of passing over control or responsibility to another person while you are off work on holiday or leaving a job.

Use it: “I’ll send my notes in a handover email so you can continue the project while I’m away.”

8. Meh

When something is a little uninspiring or dull. Also a word you could use to describe your lack of interest or indifference. It’s basically a verbal shrug.

Use it: “The film was a bit meh.”

9. Binge-watch

Watching multiple episodes of a TV show, one after another, in a single sitting. Usually with a DVD box set or using online streaming.

Use it: “I’m planning to binge-watch the entire series of Game of Thrones this weekend!”

10. Bae

An affectionate term for a girlfriend or boyfriend, short for babe or baby. Some say it’s an acronym for ‘before anyone else’.

Use it: “See you later, bae.”

INFORMATION TAKEN FROM: WWW.ENGLISH.COM

What do ANIMALS SOUND like around the world?

19 Nov

Did you know that animal sounds are different depending on the language you are speaking? When I first heard of that I didn’t want to believe it, it was too odd for me. Now I find it quite amusing 😀

My favourite one is the Rooster, its sound changes so much!

pel blog

The 60 Most Useful English Idioms

14 Nov

They say that when you are able to joke or use idioms in a foreign language that is the sign that you are fluent at it.

Englishpost.org

tired-of-idiom1.Beat around the bush: It is used when you avoid the main topic.

2.Cry over spilt milk: It is used when you complain about a loss from the past.

3.Take with a grain of salt: It is used when you don’t take what someone says too seriously.

4. Cut Corners:  It is used when you do something bad to save money

5. Devil’s Advocate: It is used when you present a counter argument

6. The Best of Both Worlds:  It is used when you can enjoy two different opportunities at the same time.

7. Speak of the devil: It is used when you are speaking about somebody and that person turns up at the moment.

8. Once in a blue moon: It is used when an event doesn’t happen too often

9. When Pigs fly: It is used when something will never…

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Famous people who HAD TO learn English

12 Nov

I always tell my ESL students how useful learning English is going to be for their future. Here there are some clear examples of how learning English helped some celebrities.
Thank you for this interesting post Aiyshah 🙂

The FUTURE of Learning

edd

(Photo credit:  http://bit.ly/2lo7j8y)

Though many ESL students are not that familiar with the western celebrity scene, I’d like to put forward some of our well known American celebrities today just as a motivator that even the rich and famous needed to learn English to get ahead.

These stories have been taken from different website and the sites are recorded below for more information go to those sites.

1. Jackie Chan (originally from China)

Possibly the best thing about laughter is that it reads the same in every language! Known for making everyone laugh in too many comedy films to count, Jackie Chan was actually a movie star in China long before he made his way to America. Born and raised in China, it makes sense that Chinese is his first language. Mr. Chan is another celebrity who spent time learning English, which he is fluent in today.

2…

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Where do NEW WORDS come from?

10 Sep

I think I might be one of the “Geeks” they mention in the video… Whenever I see there is a video related to languages or words history I cannot resist to watch it 😀 I consider myself a History Geek and I am proud of it! After teaching English I would have liked to become a History and Geography teacher 🙂

Where did English come from?

2 Nov

Ted Talks are fantastic! Besides, I love learning history facts about the languages I can speak. It makes them even more interesting 😀

So here there is this great 5 minutes video where we can learn many things about the origin of the English language. As well as the origin of some other languages that maybe we never thought would be connected to English.

I hope you enjoy it as much as I did 🙂

// IDIOMLAND \\

4 Mar

I just found this great website called IDIOMLAND that helps you learn the meaning of idioms in a visual way and through in context examples taken from films and TV series. I’m in love with it!!!

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