Tag Archives: article to read

Helping Kids Understand Conflict and Self-Control

26 Jul

It has been several weeks since my last post. I have to admit I have been enjoying my days off! However, I also like using my free time reading some interesting educational articles.

I mentioned “BusyTeacher.org” on my last post and this time I would like to share another website I really like because of its articles on education: MindShift. The article I found deals with giving children some tools to help them understand conflict and self-control. Personally, I think it is very urgent to help our students deal with these aspects.

Imatge relacionada

4 Tools To Help Kids Understand Conflict and Self-Control

Let’s face it: Kids have diverse opinions and they’re bound to disagree with one another. Today arguments occur not only in the hallway or classroom, but online as well. And whether or not these conflicts escalate can depend on how well students recognize and manage their emotions.

There are many ways to help build self-control in the face of rising frustration, whether students turn to meditation or build constructed arguments on the fly. Since we live in a democracy that values passionate and polarizing views — especially in our educational systems — it’s all the more important to know how to help kids manage their feelings responsibly.   

Here are some tips and tools for seamlessly integrating self-control and life-skills-building into the classroom.

Mars Gen One

 

Mars Gen One: Argubot Academy

One way to promote healthy debate is by showing students that good arguments are based on thorough preparation. This game lets students select claims and evidence to become more persuasive. Once they learn the art of the argument, students can debate some tough topics online or in class. By practicing the game’s techniques, students will be ready for that next conflict with facts, and not have to resort to underhanded tactics or name-calling.

 

Listenwise

ListenwiseA website filled with podcasts covering current events, Listenwise is a good platform for students to practice patience when confronted with controversial ideas or opposing views that appear in the news on topics like race, politics and religion. As students listen, they can describe and rank the strength of their emotions as the story progresses. Then, they can analyze how their reactions changed over time, reflect on how diverse opinions made them feel, and make a strategy for being mindful in the future.

Twitter

Twitter

Twitter has been a go-to platform for teens and adults to air grievances, and the consequences can have a lasting impact on people’s digital footprints. Twitter is also a valuable communications tool that can be a great way to share ideas and engage in conversations. Kids need to understand the risks of social sharing and can be taught the importance of using the tool conscientiously by seeing some of the consequences of tweeting emotionally or impulsively. Students can tweet about a topic from class. But before it goes out into the world, they can write out how they think people will react to it.

 

Smiling Mind

Smiling Mind

Smiling Mind is an app that helps students practice meditation through breathing exercises and visualizations. Practicing some of these self-calming skills have been shown to help kids focus at school and at home. Smiling Mind can help kids learn lifelong skills to cope with stress and stay calm. Hopefully the next time they get into an argument, they’ll remember to just breathe.

 

 

 

FIND THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE HERE: https://www.kqed.org/mindshift/47772/4-tools-to-help-kids-understand-conflict-and-self-control 

[What to do on the last days of class]

17 Jun

I love the website busyteacher.org, it offers all sort of resources for teachers. My favourite section in the web is the articles one, it has really helpful ideas! The plus side, is that there are many articles focusing on ESL, which is even more helpful for me 🙂

I am about to start my last week of the scholar year, I cannot believe how quickly it all went! Some of you might be in the same situation; therefore, when I found this article with ideas for the last lessons I thought it would be nice to share it in here.

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The end of the year is a special time for any class. Students may have a tough time focusing on getting through the final days of school, but there is a lot you can do to keep them engaged.

Screenshot_20180530-085623click on the image to read the whole article

7 ways to Assess without Testing

23 May

A workmate sent me this article by Steve Wheeler and thought it would be good to share it in here:

There has been much consternation in recent weeks about the amount of standardised testing the British government is determined to impose upon English school children. Children don’t learn any more or any better because of standardised testing, unless there is feedback on how they can improve. But SATs seem to be the weapon of choice for many governments across the globe. It seems that little else matters but the metrics by which our political masters judge our schools. At a recent head teachers conference, one of the most astute comments was ‘you can assess without testing.’ There are many ways to assess, and here are seven:

Click on the image to read the whole article

test

How the Power of Interest Drives Learning

3 Apr

I would like to share this article from “Mind/Shift”. It can make us think a lot about our teaching methods.

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In recent years researchers have begun to build a science of interest, investigating what interest is, how interest develops, what makes things interesting, and how we can cultivate interest in ourselves and others. They are finding that interest can help us think more clearly, understand more deeply, and remember more accurately. Interest has the power to transform struggling performers, and to lift high achievers to a new plane.

READ THE ARTICLE

What do Students Remember Most About Teachers?

22 Dec

Source: What Students Remember Most About Teachers | Edutopia

Hey, New Teacher, Don’t Quit. It Will Get Better

22 Nov

Good evening everyone! I was surfing the internet and I bumped into this article. It made me think a lot…not only because it is true, but also because it can happen to experienced teachers. Parents change, laws change, school directors change and a looong etcetera can affect our lovely teaching jobs.

READ THE ARTICLE HERE

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What makes GREAT teaching?

6 Nov

A new report has reviewed all the research into what makes teaching effective. Popular teaching methods, such as lavishing praise on pupils and grouping students by ability, are not based on evidence and can harm student development, a report has found.

The Sutton Trust examined 200 pieces of research on what makes great teaching, concluding that some common practices have no grounding in research while other less popular approaches can be effective. The report found that the two most important elements of great teaching were the quality of instruction and how well a teacher knew their subject.

Different methods for evaluating teaching were also examined, including lesson observations and getting students to rate their teachers. All these methods were deemed useful, but the report said that they were also easy to get wrong and should not to be used in isolation.

Key findings

The two factors with the strongest evidence of improving pupil attainment are:

  • teachers’ content knowledge, including their ability to understand how students think about a subject and identify common misconceptions
  • quality of instruction, which includes using strategies like effective questioning and the use of assessment

Specific practices which have good evidence of improving attainment include:

  • challenging students to identify the reason why an activity is taking place in the lesson
  • asking a large number of questions and checking the responses of all students
  • spacing-out study or practice on a given topic, with gaps in between for forgetting
  • making students take tests or generate answers, even before they have been taught the material

Common practices which are not supported by evidence include:

  •  using praise lavishly
  • allowing learners to discover key ideas by themselves
  • grouping students by ability
  • presenting information to students based on their “preferred learning style”

 

To read the report: http://www.suttontrust.com/researcharchive/great-teaching/

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