NON-VERBAL classroom management

22 Jun

I would like to share with you these great tips by Tammi Pittaro (her blog–> presentlygifted.org.)

What does nonverbal classroom management look like and how can a teacher keep students focused on learning without using words or sounds? Here are five very simple, no-cost, low-tech ways that have worked for me over the years.

1. One, Two, Three…Eyes on Me!

I have found that making eye contact with each child early and often in the day or the period helps him or her stay on track in the classroom. I make sure I greet each student warmly by name and look him or her in the eye upon entering my classroom. Then, during direct teaching or working with a few students, I make sure I continue to do so. Students are more likely to stay on task and behave appropriately when they know the teacher is watching. Making eye contact, especially in Western cultures, signifies respect, interest, appreciation, trust and friendship. It’s an important skill to teach young children and to model as you teach.

2. Work the room

Where you stand or teach can make a big difference. Moving around as you teach helps keep your students focused. Without skipping a beat, you can move nearer to those students who might be distracted or fooling around. Your proximity will send a message to get back to business, and you don’t usually have to say a word. Pause for a few moments near the student who has been off-task and teach from there for a bit before moving on. A little eye contact helps here as well. A good practice while students are working independently or in small groups is to keep moving among them. I’ve observed (and experienced first hand) that when teachers sit, trouble can be brewing at the opposite end of the classroom! And most of us can use the extra physical activity!

3. Sign Language

I found sign language posters by Rick Morris (www.newmanagement.com) years ago, and I have used them ever since with students in grades K through 8. I use the first five, although he has now has fourteen in all. I have them posted in my classroom and teach them the first day of school. They are easy for the students to learn and very effective, especially in larger groups. Students like them, too! Check out Rick’s website for more good tips!

4. Keep a silent eye on the clock (or your watch)

Want to get your class quiet quickly? Just look at the clock, or your watch, assume a sad expression and shake your head just a bit. Don’t say a word! Your students will get the message loud and clear. If you deduct the time you have waited from allotted preferred activity time, such as recess or classroom games (see Tools for Teaching: Discipline, Instruction, Motivation by Fred Jones), you won’t have to wait very often for silence. I first observed this during student teaching by an experienced teacher, and it still works after all these years!

5. “S-O-R-R-Y”

In my experience, this is really effective in the primary and elementary grades. On the first day of school, explain to your students that if you ever have to write SORRY on the board, it will mean that the class has lost a privilege they enjoy, such as free time or recess. When undesired behaviors occur, start to print the word “S-O-R-R-Y” one letter at a time on the board without making a big deal about it. Don’t erase the any of the letters you have written until the end of the day or after the preferred activity. Rarely will you get to “Y.” I promise! Works like a charm.

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One Response to “NON-VERBAL classroom management”

  1. Patricia Dorsey June 23, 2015 at 5:49 pm #

    Reblogged this on How can I control my class? and commented:
    The Mrs. D. look? Non-verbal classroom management? Yes, these strategies should work without us having to our voice to regain attention. I’ve used these strategies in times past and know they work. One of my former students in CT called it the “Mrs. D. look.” He explained that I would raise my eyebrows and look over my glass frames and just stare. I had no idea that I did that but it apparently worked. Love it!

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